follow that canoe: Pitcairn

and some fabulous photos from Pitcairn…

http://www.hokulea.com/hokulea-update-pitcairn-visit/?utm_source=MadMimi&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Worldwide+Voyage+Education+Update&utm_campaign=20170322_m138254705_Teachers+feed+daily&utm_term=Read+More

Nestled in the southern Pacific Ocean, the Pitcairn Islands dot the sea with clusters of volcanic islands and atolls. The islands form the last British Overseas Territory in the Pacific and remains one of the most pristine places on Earth due to its remote location. The island has only 39 permanent residents who showed their support and excitement of hosting Hawaiʻi’s voyaging canoe and led the crew on an island tour.

Some of the pics show how low the islands are, raised coral beds, volcanic rock… barely peeping out of the sea. This makes it very hard for navigators trying to find the island from hundreds of miles away, the islands basically duck behind the waves! It takes incredible navigation to find them, and the Hokule’a crew can do it.

The earliest known settlers of the Pitcairn Islands were Polynesians who appear to have lived on Pitcairn and Henderson, and on Mangareva Island 400 kilometres (250 mi) to the northwest, for several centuries. They traded goods and formed social ties among the three islands despite the long canoe voyages between them, which helped the small populations on each island survive despite their limited resources. Eventually, important natural resources were exhausted, inter-island trade broke down and a period of civil war began on Mangareva, causing the small human populations on Henderson and Pitcairn to be cut off and eventually become extinct.

Although archaeologists believe that Polynesians were living on Pitcairn as late as the 15th century, the islands were uninhabited when they were rediscovered by Europeans

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